Posted on Aug 10, 2016

Professional Service KPIs

Professional Service Organizations (PSO) often deal in Human Capital (i.e. they sell time), which creates pressure to manage quickly but not always effectively. Even as they advise business owners, leaders in a PSO neglect many of the same operational and financial issues in their own organizations. Before client service and profits begin to decline, PSO leaders must identify their operational inefficiencies and decide if they have the resources internally or externally to address them. A well-managed PSO anticipates change with the right key performance indicators — helping leaders look ahead instead of always over their shoulders.

Outsourcing has gotten a bad reputation ever since it became interchangeable with the concept of sending services to cheaper third-world countries — everything from IT help desks to customer service centers, simple tax returns and even some forms of legal assistance.

When we talk about outsourcing, we still use the term in a traditional sense, PSO KPI WP Downloadwhich is the delegation of non-core functions that will positively support firm revenue and professional or owner productivity. Commonly in small to mid-sized PSOs, such functions can include accounting and payroll, HR, IT and marketing.

At a certain scale, organizations will choose to manage such functions in-house. As a rule, however, growing companies can ramp up faster through an effective arrangement with outside consultants and vendors. The best outsourced partnerships act just like an in-house department with the same level of dedication and collaboration, but without the same overhead costs. In addition, the experts in these functions can educate leaders on KPIs, efficiencies, product and process selection and ultimately the selection of in-house staff when the time is right.

Some outsourcing functions, such as accounting and payroll, also provide a level of risk management by delegating sensitive financial and benefit information to highly trained professionals who consistently perform these functions for a variety of clients. Of course, you will want to obtain referrals and pursue due diligence to secure the right vendor relationship — one that understands your industry, workforce regulations or financials.

Often smaller companies will hire an office manager to handle their accounting, billing, taxes and payroll functions. However, growth in clients and employees quickly places a large burden on the original office manager to keep up with A/R and collections, payroll changes and financial reporting.

Rather than continue to hire support staff, PSOs should hire for the position most needed and augment back-office needs with services from their CPA. This move keeps the ratio of billable staff high, which leads to positive revenue per billable consultant and higher utilization.

Not all CPAs are equal in the level of accounting, payroll or tax services they can offer. Some provide the minimum in bookkeeping while others can support strategic planning, CFO-level consulting and related automation to increase the efficiency of KPI reporting and analysis.

A big question for owners is how well the outsourced relationship will align with existing processes, staff and the overall business model. In fact, will the outsourced relationship make the organization more efficient or just more expensive?

Here are the benefits you should look for:

  • Owners and senior staff can focus on core, billable services
  • Processes are added that increase efficiency and ease of reviewing ROI
  • Communication is seamless and timely
  • The link between business goals, operations and profits improves
  • Leaders are updated on changes or opportunities to optimize the service

At Cornwell Jackson, our tax and business services teams have worked with clients for many years to optimize back-office functions, but also assist with business strategy and planning. We have supported PSOs in determining the best KPIs, the optimal level of staffing and timely introduction of accounting tools and processes that enhance their growth. For more information on how your PSO can face today’s growth challenges head-on with a qualified outsourced relationship, contact us.

MR HeadshotMike Rizkal, CPA is a partner in Cornwell Jackson’s Audit and Attest Service Group. In addition to providing advisory services to privately held, middle-market businesses, Mike oversees the firm’s ERISA practice, which includes annual audits of approximately 75 employee benefit plans. Contact him at mike.rizkal@cornwelljackson.com.

Posted on Jul 27, 2016

Professional Service KPIs

A well-managed PSO anticipates change with the right key performance indicators — helping leaders look ahead instead of always over their shoulders. Whether PSOs are considering M&A, structuring pricing or forecasting capacity, it comes down to numbers.

Every service organization should have a list of key performance indicators (KPIs) that measure how well the business is doing. KPIs will be different for every organization, but in general PSOs should look at the following five:

  • Annual Revenue per Billable Consultant – Total revenue divided by the number of billable consultants — this should minimally equal one to two times the fully loaded cost of the consultant
  • Annual Revenue per Employee – Total revenue divided by the total number of employees (billable and nonbillable) – this should be close two times the fully loaded cost per person
  • Billable Utilization – Calculated by dividing the total billable hours by 2,000 (the average utilization per employee) – this KPI is central to profitability and signals the need to expand or contract the workforce
  • Project Overrun – Percent of budgeted cost to actual cost – consistent project overruns eat into profits and signal inefficient project governance
  • Profit Margin – Calculated as revenue that remains after paying for the direct costs of delivering a project (payroll, transportation, materials, etc.) – can be fixed-price or not to exceed price or related to hourly time and expense.

PSO KPI WP DownloadBecause they sell knowledge and service, PSOs realize revenue growth and profits mainly by leveraging people effectively. Time is truly money in a PSO. Not every minute can be billed, and many PSOs support nonbillable activities such as volunteering to enhance their team culture. However, the ratio of billable activities must be high enough to achieve per person revenue goals and margins. By the same token, nonbillable employees must be a smaller percentage of the overall employment base compared to billable employees.

Effective KPIs are monitored and reviewed regularly. This can happen during senior leadership team or sales meetings, but the emphasis is on regular review. The biggest squeak gets the grease, and leaders must commit to change before they will see it in their organizations.

Here are some of the ways that PSOs can improve the five primary KPIs:

  • Leveraging senior-level professionals for high-level consulting and project oversight
  • Delegating project management and technical services to mid-level professionals
  • Right-pricing engagements
  • Defining and focusing on ‘A’ clients
  • Increasing efficiency of project delivery through processes, productization and automation
  • Outsourcing nonbillable or repetitive tasks that relate to running the organization

Such methods sound like common sense in theory, but we are still dealing with people. Depending on the size of the organization, prioritize which methods to pursue first that would make the biggest impact on profits.

  • Do you have low-profit clients that need to be transitioned to another service provider?
  • Do you have senior professionals unaware of tasks they could delegate (or unwilling)?
  • Are your processes inefficient because they are tailored too much for each client, and therefore impossible to delegate?
  • Are you underpricing your services or underestimating the actual time it will take to deliver them?
  • Are you sacrificing client service in the pursuit of new business?

Every PSO experiences these challenges. Being aware of them is the first step to discussing solutions to eliminate them.

In any event, one of the simplest ways to boost KPIs is to limit the time that owners and senior staff spend working in the business rather than on it. This relates to all of those time-consuming administrative, financial and operational tasks that must be done, but could be done more efficiently and cost-effectively by someone else — allowing professionals to focus on billable client work.

At Cornwell Jackson, our tax and business services teams have worked with clients for many years to optimize back-office functions, but also assist with business strategy and planning. We have supported PSOs in determining the best KPIs, the optimal level of staffing and timely introduction of accounting tools and processes that enhance their growth. For more information on how your PSO can face today’s growth challenges head-on with a qualified outsourced relationship, contact us.

MR HeadshotMike Rizkal, CPA is a partner in Cornwell Jackson’s Audit and Attest Service Group. In addition to providing advisory services to privately held, middle-market businesses, Mike oversees the firm’s ERISA practice, which includes annual audits of approximately 75 employee benefit plans. Contact him at mike.rizkal@cornwelljackson.com.

 

 

Posted on Jul 13, 2016

Professional Service Organization

Professional Service Organizations (PSO) often deal in Human Capital (i.e. they sell time), which creates pressure to manage quickly but not always effectively. Even as they advise business owners, leaders in a PSO neglect many of the same operational and financial issues in their own organizations. Before client service and profits begin to decline, PSO leaders must identify their operational inefficiencies and decide if they have the resources internally or externally to address them. A well-managed PSO anticipates change with the right key performance indicators — helping leaders look ahead instead of always over their shoulders.

Professional service organizations historically can be a scattered and distracting place. Imagine all of these intelligent individuals — lawyers, accountants, engineers or architects — selling their knowledge and time. As owner and employee numbers increase, the business model is prone to inconsistencies and neglect without an executive leadership team that focuses a percentage of time on running the business.

Some of the common operational inefficiencies we’ve seen in PSOs include:PSO KPI WP Download

  • Aging accounts receivables
  • Lack of tax planning
  • Internal control and compliance issues
  • Inadequate investment in technology (i.e outdated)
  • Misalignment between marketing strategy and the business plan
  • Reactive recruitment

One of the solutions in PSOs is to assign a partner or shareholder to certain areas of the business: technology, marketing, HR, recruitment, etc. However, lack of knowledge in these increasingly specialized areas can result in minor errors at best and legal issues at worst. Before going too far down that road, leaders need to take time and really assess the organization’s capacity to manage these areas of the business internally — or if outside expertise is necessary as well as valuable.

Top Business Challenges for PSOs

Distinguishing one professional service from another is dependent on the owners’ ability to communicate value. When you sell an intangible service or knowledge, value is hard to pin down. It requires market research on your target audiences, their service needs, how your competition communicates value and why your existing clients say they choose your organization. Failure to take a hard look at value makes it difficult to sell, let alone attract talent or manage service expectations.

And these are some of the top challenges for PSOs to sustain good margins and avoid commodity price pressure. Even before the recession, PSOs were looking at ways to perform projects with fewer on-site visits, more milestones built in, use of more subcontractors and the ability to efficiently deliver measurable results. Clients are more likely than in the past to put a cap on spending and demand tangible deliverables that match PSO fees.

According to an annual survey of top-performing PSOs across the US by SPI Research, the most profitable PSOs are more specialized in their service offerings and/or they concentrate on high-growth segments where they are often the market leader. A significant portion of business comes through referrals thanks to their market leading reputation, and they have created a transparent culture of communication that attracts clients and employees.

According to the 2016 SPI Research survey, top-performing PSOs averaged net profits of just over 20 percent while average firms reported net revenues of 14.9%. Interestingly, the top PSOs referenced in the survey are incorporating some level of technology consulting in their practices.

Technology Is Partial Solution

PSOs have two challenges when addressing technology needs: operational and client focused. A 2016 survey by Computer Economics showed that PSOs were more likely to budget for operational IT spending — upgrades of existing IT — than investment in new IT solutions through capital outlay. One possible explanation is the migration of many organizations to cloud technology.

 When considering IT investment, it is important to look at internal as well as external investments. Demonstrating up-to-date technology is a primary recruiting tool because younger professionals prefer to work in organizations that leverage technology for efficiency (e.g. workflow, remote work, databases). The right technology investment can also help PSOs measure performance (e.g. CRM, web analytics, marketing automation, financial reporting).

In addition, technology is a selling point for clients in terms of delivering services cost-effectively, helping them translate historic data into smart business decisions and also forecast opportunities (e.g. portals, accounting software, point of sale systems, time and billing, enterprise systems).

However, new technology investment can only augment staffing, attract clients and increase revenue when it is aligned with the business strategy. Too many organizations invest in a software solution or peddle it to their clients without fully developing a strategy around its value — or providing staff training to use it effectively. Moreover, growth can delay timely investment in software or even cloud-based applications that can support efficient back-office functions.

Getting back to basics, PSOs must assess their vision and assign leaders to each area of the organization: finance, operations and marketing. Then they must name and prioritize their goals:

  • Increase productivity
  • Control cost
  • Attract and retain talented people
  • Solve complex business issues
  • Provide outstanding client service
  • Financial and tax compliance
  • Managing technology and future investments to stay competitive

How should finance, operations and marketing align to support these goals?

 Seek New Business Opportunities

One goal not mentioned yet is the development of new business opportunities. Successful PSOs are not only expanding services with existing clients, but also adding new clients. The most successful PSOs surveyed by SPI Research derived more than 20 percent of revenue from new clients. At the same time, they kept employee headcount growth lower than revenue growth through a larger sales pipeline and efficient resource management. While the slowest-growing organizations reported higher profitability, the danger was in neglecting new business opportunities in favor of short-term profits.

In a 2015 blog post, SPI Research cautioned PSOs from discounting, as survey respondents noted a prevalence of longer sales cycles and fewer winning proposals when the PSO offered price concessions. The promise of future work rarely made up for the loss in margin because clients that demanded discounting already perceived the service as a commodity.

Other ways of expanding business can happen by positioning the PSO as a leader in a particular industry vertical, thereby elevating the sophistication of the service or consulting offered. We have also seen PSO growth through M&A.

M&A activity in PSOs can include a “horizontal merger” in which firms within the same industry merge in order to add capacity and clients as well as expand geographically. PSOs can also explore product extension mergers by aligning or acquiring complimentary services such as an engineering firm adding general contractor services or a law firm adding collections services. Of course, such mergers must occur within the legal limits of the industries involved, and there are additional costs associated with M&A.

At Cornwell Jackson, our tax and business services teams have worked with clients for many years to optimize back-office functions, but also assist with business strategy and planning. We have supported PSOs in determining the best KPIs, the optimal level of staffing and timely introduction of accounting tools and processes that enhance their growth. For more information on how your PSO can face today’s growth challenges head-on with a qualified outsourced relationship, contact us.

Mike Rizkal, CPAMR Headshot is a partner in Cornwell Jackson’s Audit and Attest Service Group. In addition to providing advisory services to privately held, middle-market businesses, Mike oversees the firm’s ERISA practice, which includes annual audits of approximately 75 employee benefit plans. Contact him at mike.rizkal@cornwelljackson.com.

Posted on Apr 18, 2015

Every small business owner knows the feeling… when morale is low around the office and it seems that everyone is complaining about processes and working amongst chaos just to keep their heads above water.  At the same time, everyone is fighting the adoption of the new software that has promised to make things run more smoothly in the office.  Even after multiple training sessions and trying different management styles to make the company more efficient, the back office still has frequent process issues. How hard can it really be to have an efficiently operating bookkeeping and administrative department? 

Improving processes and leveraging the technology investments that have already been made is a good place to start. But, let’s be honest, it can be difficult to find time and resources to make improvements while simultaneously running the business. So, what is the right way to delegate the proper execution of running your business?

Has there ever been an employee that made both you and your business look good constantly? If so, chances are you wanted to ensure that they stay with the company forever. Keeping the right employees and helping the negative, non-effective employees move on to other ventures are one of the two most difficult things about running a small business.

Let’s start by discussing the harder and more critical of the two: Removing negative employees from the company. This is important because if an employee is a bad fit for a number of reasons, for example: they can lose customers and even run good employees away.  Although it is easy enough to calculate the cost of a bad hire from lost revenue, inefficient use of resources, and recruiting fees to replace a bad hire, it is important to also consider the indirect costs that are compounded due to the current business environment.

For example, the pace of today’s work environment caused by technology and streamlined processes has eliminated most routine positions and therefore requires employees to work more effectively with less supervision. This may be most evident in employees with plenty of experience but who have trouble keeping pace in today’s environment. Technology and streamlined processes are making it difficult for some employees to see how they add value to the company. These employees are motivated by the fear of losing their jobs and wreak havoc on the growth and success of the company to ensure their job security.

If experienced employees are unable to adapt to streamlined processes, there will be a decline in knowledge translation to the younger generation that thrives in today’s environment. These types of indirect costs are extremely difficult to measure but wreak havoc on the success of the business.

Let’s revisit the question – what is the right way to delegate the proper execution of running your business?Hiring and retaining the right people could be much easier than once thought. Consider Outsourcing: no recruiting fees, job ads, technology investments, or other chaos.  Go and Grow can develop a solution tailor made for your business. The first step is to begin automating  your accounting processes. Next, develop processes to make the business smarter and more efficient to reduce costs and increase productivity.

Here are some examples:

  • Eliminate cumbersome and time-consuming manual tasks such as data entry, envelope stuffing, filing and check runs
  • Pay bills online at a fraction of the time it takes to process and sign checks
  • Automate customer collections
  • Stop opening mail by having the vendor emails sent directly into the accounting software
  • Reduce human error and increase accuracy with automated software
  • Improve internal controls to reduce the risk of fraud
  • Improve timely reporting of financial results
  • Improve collaboration of limited resources

Let us help put these processes in place and become the back office for your business at a much lower cost with better controls. Call us to get started today.